Tag Archives: CG

Ninjas, Ninjas, Ninjas

You just can’t get enough of them.  If you want to see more check out this trailer.  It’s was created  by five people.  Three were in charge of the animation and two where in charge of sound and music.  Now if you haven’t noticed, the style is very 80’s to early 90’s.  To me it reminds me of the Ninja Turtles, the animation the came out like 2 years ago. What’s even stranger is the ninjas themselves reminds me of the ninjas in Mortal Kombat.  Maybe because of the colors of their suits.  I was waiting for one of them to “Get Over HERE”.  Anyways enjoy the video don’t forget to check out their deviantart page at boom-bros.deviantart.com.

Mancandy Has Grown Old

Check out this little piece to promote the Blender Institute’s open movie called “Durian“.  The video is a cool and funny concept.  It does make you wonder what kind of character or thing the man is talking too.  I’ve been an avid watcher of animations that used Blender as their tool, and let me tell you, it has come a long way.  The facial animation is probably the best I’ve seen from Blender. The render is done well too.  If more professionals use it, the whole 3D world will be turned upside down.

The small piece was created by David Bolton.  He used a pre-existing model/rigg called Mancandy (opensource) and added his own flair to. Kudos for making something old new again.  This is also shows how when you focus on an  area (this being animation), the quality will always be great.

9 may be fine

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On 09-09-09, the movie 9 came out.  It’s about a bunch of little mechanical rag doll-looking characters that roam around a post-war earth where battles between humans and robots resulted in the destruction of humanity.  Shane Acker, the director of the film, created 9 from a short film he made as a UCLA student.

Visually, this is probably one of the best looking CG animated feature film I’ve seen in a while.  It’s about time an animated CG feature strayed away from the “plastic” shaders that is overly used by Pixar and DreamWorks.  It’s been over 10 years since Toy Story came out and Pixar/DreamWorks are still giving us CG movies that look like those little toys.  Fortunately, the movie 9 has the balls to try something visually new, at least in terms of the mainstream CG feature length films.  If you like Blur Studios’ game cinematics, you’ll love the imagery in 9.  Tim Burton’s producing role on this film seemed to influence some of the character’s and environment’s designs.  Simply put, you can see the “Burton Style” that is seen in Nightmare before Christmas and James and the Giant Peach.  It has dark hues, Goth, simple designs, great detail mixed with old school Disney charms.

The plot was good in the beginning of the movie when there’s a lot of discovery and suspense.  However, by the end, it was a little dissatisfying as the main character doesn’t seem to grow at all.  Throughout the movie, the audience is presented with two main viewpoints on how to live life by either curiosity or fear.  We’re supposed to cheer for curiosity, but I thought the character who was supposed to be afraid was simply being cautious.  In the end, some characters learn facts, but what fun is knowledge without “more” friends to share them with?  Still, it’s a good watch.

Rating: GOODNESS

From The Hoop

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Yep, here is another short created from Supinfocom.  The animation was directed by 3 students.  Anthony Arnoux, Remi Dessinges  and Guillaume Fesquet made the film inspired by Earl Manigault, a basketball player who lost everything to drugs.  During his late life, he dedicated his time helping the kids in Harlem avoid the same mistakes he’s had.

Looking at the piece, I never really knew what the animation was about.  After reading the explaination, it really made more sense to me.  I don’t know what their teaching their students at Supinfocom, but don’t stop.  The stuff that is coming out of that school can be mistaken for something from one of the major studios.

Let’s enjoy the short and visit the website where you’ll learn more of the making of  “From The Hoop” at www.fromthehoop.com.